How to navigate a heart

///

Swab the deck
from stem to
stern and silent longing.

Sink ventricle
soak atrium
link chamber to placid port,
anchored marrow stored and
saved,
waved into wake
and pitched loose
over rail.

Sail.

Written for The Sunday Whirl Wordle.

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14 Responses to How to navigate a heart

  1. sorrygnat says:

    Tremendous – hits home; had open heart surgery in 1995, heart valve replacement (birth defect), bypass and further surgery 5 days later; incredible experience, because I sail, that’s what I do, I sail – gratitude for your post.

    • whimsygizmo says:

      Oh! Esther, it means a lot to me that this translates literally, as well as figuratively.
      And you do indeed SAIL, my friend. I am enjoying your book immensely. :)

  2. Misky says:

    Vivid and a thrilling. Take me sailing with you next time; I want to feel that too!

  3. pmwanken says:

    eye atrium ewe — and your way with words! ;)

  4. Anchors Aweigh! Float, float on! A most excellent adventure, that love thing!

  5. I almost turned “stern” into “sternum” and thought surely you would too. :)

    I feel like “saved” is the hingepoint.

  6. ihatepoetry says:

    Inventive and bittersweet, two of my favorite qualities in anything.

  7. JulesPaige says:

    The heart of the sea (all life)… ebb, flow – and we are just travelers upon her watery skin.
    Delightful in it’s entire brevity!

    I’m here:
    http://julesgemsandstuff.blogspot.com/2012/08/sw-wordle-68-staying-afloat.html

  8. Sarav says:

    Very heartfelt and clever, De–just the title made me happy

  9. seingraham says:

    You rock – as usual – I’m green – as usual. Nice.

    http://thepoet-tree-house.blogspot.it/2012/08/eye-rail.html

  10. Carol Steel says:

    This is wonderful..I love the last four lines especially. “and picthed loose
    over the rail” can mean so many things, so much. Great write.

  11. Carol Steel says:

    sorry… “pitched loose over the rail”

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